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committee in britain. now the justice department in this country is investigating whether the murdoch empire broke the law. that's ahead. you're watching "hardball" only on msnbc. [ male announcer ] if it's true that sharks can sense even a drop of blood from a quarter of a mile away, which razor would you use? ♪ ♪ ♪ can be even more powerful, with precise pain relieving cream. it blocks pain signals fast for relief precisely where you need it most. precise. only from the makers of tylenol. a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural communities, giving them a new choice. we'll deliver better service, with thousands of new cell sites... for greater access to all the things you want, whenever you want them. it's the at&t network... and what's possible in here is almost impossible to say. so delicious. i think you'll find it's the vegetables. deliciously rich. flavorful! [ female announcer ] together at last. introducing new stouf
>>> members of parliament in britain start getting their own back after the phone hacking scandal gets deeper all the time. hello, and welcome to the brussels studios of dw-tv and "european journal." also today, pollution problems for spain. the summer series about villages and communities, starting in poland. and macedonia's ethnic-divided young that unite to protest police brutality. >>> britain's tabloid press is notoriously aggressive about -- but "news of the world" top them all. the paper, britain's oldest sunday, has been closed down, but every day brings news of arrests at high-level resignations, including senior police officers, and it is shaking rupert murdoch's empire. every time paul traveled to england, the memories at king's cross station come flooding back. six years ago, a terrorist attack killed 26 people there. the 7/7 suicide bombings claimed 56 lives, and paul was one of the first helpers' on the scene. when he used a mask to protect a young woman whose face was badly burned, his picture made it into all of the papers. he was bombarded with calls from tabloid
two front page side by side lengthy stories about something going on in britain. to do that otherwise, you would need the queen to abdicate and the plague to hit london. clearly there's a political agenda at work here. >> the testimony from the murdoches and the testimony from rebecca brooks, coverage as we said, both, here in the states and of course in the u.k. all the cable news networks on fox, on it in its entirety, no commercial breaks. do you think that the coverage was warranted, was it fair? >> was the coverage important in that it's the most important thing going on in the world, it's not. rupert murdoch and a lot of people have a lot of interest in it, yes. people want to see is this the thing that takes rupert murdoch down and you see this idea that somehow they're going to prove something that happened in this one isolated incident is actually happening everywhere else. that's what the coverage is really about, i think, is trying to blow it into something more than what it actually was. >> jon: jim, a lot of people out there would have loved to have seen some sort of a go
, notorious, "news of the world." known in britain as "news of the screws." it is the first time in a scandal that i have seen this inanimate object, this paper, punished. the people have not yet been punished, but the paper has, and the journalists are also the factor being punished. you can see immediately that this is not "the new york times ." it is flashy, full of enormously creative topography, and full of short-clad females. this is not the kind of thing that you see in "the washington post." when i was in newspapers, we used to do these mock issues. what if they had gone out and hit the loading dock? >> today, with the internet, that can happen. >> what were people looking for when they picked up this newspaper? >> much more of what we do in delivered a culture, it is a sort of envy, living vicariously. if i was only living in that said, went to those parties, dressed like that. "news of the world" started covering court cases. they did it in a very traditional, matter of fact way. the headlines were quite famous in their own right. you would pick this up knowing that you were getting
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
is about britain's response to the beginning of the civil war. i understand in the early stages of conflict that britain was sympathetic, if not supported, to the confederacy. and i would imagine because of the importance, vital importance of the british economy of the 19th century. can you tell me when that attitude changed and how and why britain changed later on? >> yeah, i think, you know, when we talk about the british, again, it was a place and they were people as competent and divide as americans are, so there were many individual britain's -- their individual britons were in favor of the confederacy. i think particularly within the ruling elites in england, people felt challenged by this sort of upstart republic that crossed the waters, or challenged philosophically challenged economically in some ways. and they also did fear what would happen if these time exports from the southern states were interrupted. the rate great many britons who were strongly anti-slavery. of course, as we know britain had had its own strong abolitionist movement for many decades, really got off the ground
that newspapers in britain play a very different role than they do here, because you don't have paid political advertising. you cannot run for office in britain without the support of a major newspaper chain. everybody needs murdoch's support. i think that eventually this is going to fade away. >> do you remember the phase willful blindness in connection with enron crimes? >> yes. it's looking the other way. >> do you think -- willful blindness will obtain in the case of prosecuting and perhaps convicting rupert? >> they may try. >> and his son. >> they may try. >> willful blind sentence. >> i don't think rupert has any -- hold it. i don't think rupert, as of now has any kind of criminal liability whatsoever. the people have a problem are below him. >> when you have a hot story, the editor, the people above say, how did you get that? it's diagnose to be very difficult to insulate the people at the top if these allegations prove true. >> let's see if we can >> thank you columbia, challenger, discovery, endeavour, and our ship atlantis. thank you for protecting us and bringing this program to su
and britain decide that this is really shameful. we don't have any institutions to build defenses. we don't have any institutions to plan and run an operation. never again. so they met on the island. they came off with an agreement. when the european union was set up there always was a security pillar. it had been put aside so that they could focus on trees that affected finance and capital market and movement of people and bringing the continent closer together. but they decided to fire up the security pillar. they set up -- nato is run, by the way, by a board of directors , the north atlantic council. military committee, and then you have various other committees, but those are the key structures that run nato. and so the europeans set up a military committee, military staff. they set up a satellite center in brussels. all the sudden focus woke up in washington and said, hey, what are these europeans doing? of the going to take away what nato is doing? there are to be duplication? the u.s. with a uk set up some ground rules. no, this is all okay, but you can set up a permanent headquart
company. news corp. saying lots of tabloids in britain engaged in all sorts of outrageous behavior. you have rupert murdoch saying this is the most humble day of his life. which will we believe? that he and management are sorry or this is being made too much of by the rest of the press? >> it's a great question, howie. i've spoken about this before. you have here a real problem. i believe rupert is sincerely, sincerely appalled and sorry that in the case of mill lee dowler which is really what brought this scandal about when it was revealed that a teenage girl's phone was tampered with in order to sell newspapers because readers might think she was still alive. >> are the critics going overboard as the "wall street journal" editorial suggests? i have only a few seconds here. >> the "wall street journal" had the right to say that i think because there are plenty of other stories in your own country, watergate, the pentagon papers, and in england the daily telegraph two years ago paid for stolen records to expose mp's stolen expenses. there is a certain complicitness in britain and here t
of israel and patrick dean the deputy undersecretary of state for great britain had a secret protocol providing that israeli troops would invade the sinai peninsula on october 29th. this was the plan. once the israelis advanced towards the suez canal zone britain and france would issue an ultimatum to egypt and israel to accept the canal zone. if as expected israel rejected the ultimatum. followed by troop landing. but remember this was secret. it was not in the newspapers. what was in the newspapers that day was that the soviet union had sent troops into budapest, hungary, killing dozens of protesters. eisenhower knew nothing of the secret meeting in paris. that day the intelligence advisory committee chaired by cia director allen dulles, that's the brother of john forceder dulles and postponed further revision of the intelligence. the committee ignored an fbi report that an unnamed country was considering military action against nasr. on monday october 29th, eisenhower campaigning in florida was handed a note as he boarded his plane for richmond, virginia. the note said that the isr
dress and the princess who wore it. great britain's new crown jewel. >>> if you were left off the guest list of the royal wedding earlier this year, this could be the next best thing, a chance to check out the dress worn by kate middleton, the royal family's newest, brightest star. >> reporter: her moment of royal glory, kate's official arrival on the global stage. her dress was the other star of the show. today at buckingham palace, crowds waited for hours for a closeup look at a new display opening today. last week the queen and the new duchess got a sneak preview but didn't quite have the planned reaction. >> horrible isn't it? >> reporter: without kate in it, the dress appears ghost-like. still half a million fans are expected. >> she seems very sweet and she's very pretty, and she seems very nice. >> kate's memorabilia will raise millions for the monarchy, turning her into a valuable asset. the royals can't help but be impressed, less than three months after the wedding she is officially the hottest ticket in town. the wedding drew more than 1 million people to buckingham palace an
for greatness and also pushes and support this project leaders to envision britain is in themselves. -- greatness in themselves. [applause] [applause] michellechu, 17, is a committed youth board member and on the youth empowerment advisory board. she is a college-bound ambassador in march from mentor school, where she is a wonderful model tutor. michelle is a responsible and motivated later working to bring you up voice to her community. [applause] nataliegranados, 18, has been a leader in the grenada movement where she had been in the budget crisis and have bravely spoken at the bourse supervisors. she has advocated for sense of participation and funding to be restored to our city's quality youth programs. [applause] [applause] roblin bonner, 18, is an outspoken member of the youth leadership. roblin graduated from downtown high where she was a passionate role model and advocated for youth to be more engaged in the political process. [applause] [applause] -- 17, pawlenty first single occupancy sro in the chinatown development center. he also wrote a grant proposal to create a bilin
of great britain going to the well to just basically defend himself and his contacts with him, which were more than any other institution or individual and the country, this is a serious, serious story and reality. >> charles? >> the murdochs were on the defensive and had a lot to defend. i thought their presentation was rather good. i think murdoch -- he runs a company that is unbelievably diverse, and this one paper is a relatively small part of it. i am not surprised, and it is plausible that the committee had a sort of accepted his protestations that he was not aware of all of these shenanigans. what i found really interesting, however, was the way the committee conducted itself. hear, when you have hearings, like the polley north hearings, the inquisitors are on a podium looking down on the defendant there, it was like a british parliament cafeteria meeting. a lot more pointed, less pompous, more effective. >> good review. last word. see you next week. for a transcript of this broadcast, log on to insidewashington.tv.
abuse. meanwhile, winehouse's best known album has shot to the top of the charts in great britain. >>> when we come back here tonight, after days of brutal heat, could the weather finally be taking a turn? imagine facing the dayer ] with less chronic low back pain. imagine living your life with less chronic osteoarthritis pain. imagine you, with less pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a non-narcotic treatment that's fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. antidepressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not approved for children under 18. people taking maois or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymbalta. taking it with nsaid pain relievers, aspirin, or blood thinners may increase bleeding risk. severe liver problems, some fatal, were reported. signs include abdominal pain and yellowing of the skin or eyes. talk with your doctor about yo
in britain following the deadly attacks in norway. this is as it emerges. the suspect in norway opposed muslim immigration to europe. he may have pushed a manifesto online just before the attacks in which he killed 93 people. this picture from the air shows the accused gunmen on his deadly mission. police say man dressed in a policeman's uniform traveled to an island near oslo where he opened fire on young people attending a political camp. he hid and some ran the others try to swim away. >> bullets are just flying. seeing people getting hit by bullets, just running next to you, it's chaotic. >> police say the suspects ran page began earlier in downtown oslo when he's off a car bomb that damaged a number of buildings including government officers -- offices. the police are not ruling out finding a second suspect areas than it closer to home. so far no arrests and no suspects in an east they shooting that left one man dead and another critically hurt. officer say someone fired a two man in richmond. a 20-year-old died at the scene. it happened outside some businesses at about 11:00 last
. britain was about finished and churchill came across the atlantic and gave a speech and he said, we haven't gone this far because we're made of sugar candy. that's the message we need now. >> that's the kind of historical perspective we all need. david mccullough, thank you very much. we will be right back. the chevy cruze eco offers an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well, to get there, a lot of complicated engineering goes into every one. like variable valve timing and turbocharging, active front grille shutters that close at high speeds, and friction reducing -- oh, man, that is complicated. how about this -- cruze eco offers 42 miles per gallon. cool? ♪ [ male announcer ] an everyday moment can turn romantic anytime. and when it does, men with erectile dysfunction can be more confident in their ability to be ready with cialis for daily use. ♪ cialis for daily use is a clinically proven low-dose tablet you take every day so you can be ready anytime the moment's right. ♪ tell your doctor about your medical condition and all medications, and a
the navy was destroyed. britain was about finished. and churchill came across the atlantic and gave a speech and said we haven't gone this far because we're made of sugar candy. that's the message we need now. >> and that's the kind of historical perspective we all need. thank you very much. we will be right back. somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. experience the summer of audi event and get over 130 channels of siriusxm satellite radio for 3 months at no charge. welcome. i understand you need a little help with your mortgage, want to avoid foreclosure. smart move. candy? um-- well, you know, you're in lu
with great respect for all of you, for parliament, and for all of the people of britain, whom you represent. this is the most mumble day of my career. after all that has happened, i know that we needed to be here today. james and i would like to say how sorry we are for what has happened, especially with regard to listening to the voicemale of victims of crime. my company has 52,000 employees. i have led it for 57 years, and i have made my share of mistakes. i have lived in many countries, employed thousands of honest and hard-working journalists. i own nearly 200 newspapers of very different sizes, and i have followed countless stories about people and families around the world. at no time do i remember being as sickened as when i heard what the dowler family had to endure, which i think was last monday week. nor do i recall being as angry as when i was told that the news of the world could have compounded their distress. i want to thank the dowlers for graciously giving me the opportunity to apologize in person. i would like all the victims of phone hacking to know how completely and deep
of great britain has said that james murdoch has to come before parliament again and classify statements. how serious an issue is this being taken at your network. >> well, it's -- you know, it's a story. we've been covering it a lot. thank god i cover wall street and don't have to report on my boss but here's the thing. if you look at this from a purely business standpoint, you know, i think the stock fell to 13. 19 was the high. after oren spoke it went up to $17 a share. when they heard his ex-practice nation, they believed him. confidence was returning back. i watch a lot of corporate executives go before congress and similar panels and they flub it. you know, thehe lose confidence in the market and wall street and that did not happen this time. >> the cover of fox and "the wall street journal" has been embarrassing for journalism. >> we've been covering it -- >> in "the wall street journal," forget fox, nobody reallyy expects fox to do -- >> fox has been covering this very seriously, arianna. >> "the wall street journal" editorials, whitewashing what is a very serious -- >> the comp
wore when she married britain's prince william. people.com reports the ivory and white satin dress is now the centerpiece at bummingham palace's annual summer opening the gown stand oons special platform topped off with a tiara the queen loaned her for the wedding. >>> it is official. don't ask, don't tell is history. what does the future hold for the military? we'll hear from an openly gay service member. but first, a doctor delivers your baby, but the hospital keeps your child until you pay your bill. does it sound a little crazy? in indonesia, it happens all the time. this week's cnn hero, arizona native robin lim has come up with a solution. >> the moment that a woman falls pregnant in indonesia, she is 300 times more likely to die in the next 12 months than if she was not pregnant. >> if you have money, you can get excellent medical services but the poorest people don't always get the services they need. >> in the hospital here cannot take you baby home till you've paid your bill. >> sometimes the mothers wait all day waiting to get in to feed their baby and change their baby'
scheduled our meeting right before the finals of "britain's got talent" and our hotel was crawling with reporters. not exactly how scammers like to be greeted. >> it will be terrible for me to disappoint shireen but we have to meet face to face or the deal is not going to happen. we may never know if it was the mead media with frenzy or something that scared them off but in the end barrister davis backs out leaving shireen angry and disappointed. >> i think he's the devil. >> we're a long way from throwing in the towel and the trail is about to lead to a place we never expected. coming up, shireen's first brush with her $15 million inheritance. why was this money funny? >> two huge men show up. >> with a crate of money. >> exactly. >> but it is all dyed black. >> it is all dooid black. >> when "dateline" continues. >> when "dateline" continues. y black. >> when "dateline" continues. ed black. >> when "dateline" continues. [ female announcer ] a fiber that is taste-free is a welcome change. a fiber that dissolves completely is clearly different. benef
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)